ब्रिटेन के शासक

मुक्त ज्ञानकोश विकिपीडिया से
यहाँ जाएँ: भ्रमण, खोज

ब्रिटेन के शासक

लंकास्टर गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of Lancaster

Henry Bolingbroke deposed Richard II, and the Royal House name came to reflect Henry's father's title, Duke of Lancaster.

1470–1471 Henry V's son

यार्क गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of York

The Houses of Lancaster and York had fought the Wars of the Roses, and the Yorkists took the throne.

1471–1483 Edward III's great-great-grandson

ट्यूडर गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of Tudor

आल्पिन गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of Alpin

Jointly with Giric ?

डंकेल्ड गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of Dunkeld

बालियोल गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of Balliol

ब्रूस गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of Bruce

बालियोल गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of Balliol For a period of time, both Edward Balliol and David II claimed the throne.

स्टुवर्ट गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of Stuart

Monarchs of England, Scotland and Ireland[संपादित करें]

In 1603, James VI of Scotland inherited the English throne upon the death of Elizabeth I in what is known as the Union of the Crowns. From then until 1707, England, Scotland and Ireland had shared monarchs.

स्टुवर्ट गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of Stuart

अन्तरकाल[संपादित करें]

स्टुवर्ट गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of Stuart (restored)

Name Reign Notes

1649-1651 and 1660–1685 Scotland (1649–1685 de jure) Charles I's elder son (crowned at Scone, in Scotland, 1651). He officially dated his reign from his father's death

Joint sovereign with her husband, William III, II and I

William II (Scotland) William I (Ireland) 1689–1702 Charles I's grandson Jointly with his wife, Mary II

हानोवर गृह[संपादित करें]

साक्से-कोबर्ग-गोथा गृह[संपादित करें]

The Royal House name was changed to reflect Victoria's marriage to Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, but she herself remained a member of the House of Hanover.

(full reign: 1910–1936) Edward VII's son

विंडसर गृह[संपादित करें]

The House of Windsor

The name of the Royal House changed from Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to Windsor in 1917 due to anti-German sentiments during World War I.